U.S. citizens: Hydrologist

U.S. Department of Agriculture
Libby, MT, United States
Position Type: 
Full-Time
Organization Type: 
Government
Experience Level: 
Not Specified

EXPIRED

Please note: this job post has expired! To the best of our knowledge, this job is no longer available and this page remains here for archival purposes only.

Summary

This position is located in Region 1 (Northern Region) on the Kootenai National Forest, Libby Ranger District with a duty location of Libby, Montana.

The incumbent is responsible for conducting and interpreting hydrologic surveys and analysis, watershed rehabilitation and management planning, and providing technical guidance within the framework of multiple-use management of forest and range lands.

For additional information about the duties of this position, please contact Stacy Thornbrugh at 406-283-7539 or email:

The USDA Forest Service has legislative authority to recruit and fill Permanent (Career/Career-Conditional), Temporary, and Term Appointments under the USDA Demonstration Project. Under this authority, any U.S. citizen may apply.
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Responsibilities

Prepares and carries out water quality monitoring programs, including preparation of plans, collection and analysis of samples, and interpretation of data.  Participates as a member of interdisciplinary teams working on land management planning, emergency burn rehabilitation, or other Forest projects.

Prepares environmental analysis reports for restoration projects being considered for implementation, and reports of findings for assigned parts of interpretive studies summarizing the results of hydrologic investigations.

Collects, analyzes, and interprets watershed data.  Conducts water resource inventories to assemble data bases required to support management programs and Forest planning. 

Collects and analyzes hydrologic data relating to the three disciplinary fields (ground-water, surface-water, quality-water), determining apparent reasons for data anomalies, and correlating the wide variety of factors that affect the information presented.

Makes frequent contact with other watershed professionals and professionals in other disciplines to exchange information, resolve problems, and test theories and method concepts against peer groups concepts and procedures.